Lab Publishes New Paper on Preventing Multiple Myeloma

Graphic AbstractWe are pleased to announce the publication of our most recent paper titled “Prevention Is the Best Treatment: The Case for Understanding the Transition from Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance to Myeloma,” which is free to view here.

Screening and prevention strategies have been used successfully in some solid tumor cancers, including breast, colon, and prostate. Multiple Myeloma is essentially always preceded by a non-malignant precursor stage called Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS).  We believe that if we could identify ways to prevent the transition from pre-malignant MGUS to myeloma, we could reduce the personal, societal and economic burden of this devastating blood cancer.  In our paper, we review some possible prevention strategies. We also provide the first data on the incidence of sleep-disordered breathing and daytime sleepiness in myeloma patients, and comprehensively detail the multi-million dollar cost of treating this disease.

Thank you to all the lab members and collaborators who contributed to this effort. We hope this paper will be helpful to the scientific and patient community, and to find others who also believe that prevention is the best treatment.

Laboratory Receives NCI Seed Grant to Study Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia!!

We are pleased to announce that we have received a one-year, $60,000 seed grant to nci-arrowexamine the environmental and genetic determinants underlying the transition of of MGUS into multiple myeloma. MGUS is a precursor, pre-malignant condition that occurs before the development of multiple myeloma. The majority of MGUS cases are benign, but can be devastating when it develops into multiple myeloma. Risk factors for MGUS and myeloma are age, sex, race and obesity and there is currently no cure for myeloma. In a collaboration with Dr. Gail Bishop,  we will use these funds to investigate the causes behind malignant transformation. Based on a theory advanced by Dr. Bates, we will investigate a potential association between myeloma and sleep apnea. The short-term goal of this collaborative effort is to determine the effect of intermittent hypoxia on the immune system and on pre-malignant plasma cells.

As a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa is empowered to fund a variety of mission-aligned developmental research projects (such as this one) through its NCI award. Every comprehensive cancer center including the University of Iowa’s HCCC stresses the importance of multidisciplinary approaches in research and care, ensuring greater productivity and a faster translation of discoveries into more effective treatments.

New Paper Accepted in Oncotarget!

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Multiple myeloma is an incurable plasma cancer and the second most common blood malignancy. We have been interested in the role oxygen plays in mediating the progression of this disease and our new collaboration with the Translational Myeloma Group at the University of Iowa has yielded it’s first publication in the journal Oncotarget. We are glad to have had the opportunity to help the Zhan Laboratory with the effort. Our paper titled “Alteration of Mitochondrial Biogenesis Promotes Disease Progression in Multiple Myeloma” should be available soon!

Professor Bates Receives Seed Grant from the American Cancer Society !

blood-cancerWe feel fortunate to be the proud recipients of an American Cancer Society Seed Grant to continue our work investigating how obesity promotes hematological malignancy (cancer of the blood). This grant is administered through the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa and will provide us with the resources to really take this line of research to the next level. Dr. Bates is looking forward to joining the fight to prevent cancer and develop new treatments for patients in need!