Lab films methods video on measuring the lung structure-function relationship!

Last week our lab came together in the Clinical Research Unit at the University of Iowa to film the online supplement to our paper titled “Combining volumetric capnography and barometric plethysmography to measure the lung structure-function relationship.” This method allows the investigator to measure the volume of the airways at different lung volumes, to more comprehensively evaluate the lung. As we say in the paper…

This may be a valuable tool for investigators aiming to quantify the influence of airways mechanics versus lung compliance and elastance on pulmonary function in healthy and diseased populations. Furthermore accounting for the absolute lung volume at which the… measurements are being performed allows investigators to characterize the effects of conditions that can alter the inflation state of the lung, such as obesity, lung transplant, or interventions like chest wall strapping.  [This method] may ultimately have clinical utility in the intensive care setting.

The paper is in-press with the Journal of Visualized Experiments and will be available soon. Thanks to our collaborators and lab members who came out and contributed to the process!

 

New paper accepted in Frontiers in Physiology!

A  focus of our laboratory is understanding the regulation of pulmonary blood vessels by hypoxia, including non-canonical intrapulmonary shunt vessels. While we still don’t understand a lot about their structure, we recently found that they are regulated (in part) by the beta-2 adrenergic pathway. Beta-2 adrenergic receptors cause dilation (or widening) of blood vessels in the body. Blocking these receptors prevents intrapulmonary shunt vessels from being fully recruited. This is important because opening these pathways may compromise oxygen uptake, which is a major function of the lung.

There is a lot about these pathways that we still don’t understand. Our current interest is motivated by their identification in the lungs of infants and adults that have died of pulmonary hypertension. We hope that by studying their regulation, we can better understand the role they play in lung disease and develop new treatments for these patients.

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